Peace Science Made Accessible, Understandable, and Useful.

Why Do Individuals Support Political Violence?

Why Do Individuals Support Political Violence?

When aggrieved individuals perceive that their political activities make a difference, they are less likely to support political violence to change the status quo, meaning that this sense of “political efficacy” is a moderating factor in individuals’ likelihood to support political violence.

Why Do Some Protests Escalate to Violence?

Why Do Some Protests Escalate to Violence?

A protest is more likely to escalate to violence a) the more recently it has faced state repression and b) when it is spontaneous rather than well-organized.

The Role of National Identity in American Responses to Terrorism

The Role of National Identity in American Responses to Terrorism

The U.S. response to terrorism, both domestic and transnational, has been rooted in ontological security, meaning that a state will seek to protect and perpetuate its own national identity, resulting in the U.S. government historically overlooking terrorism perpetrated by right-wing groups that aligned with a dominant American national identity.

Local Knowledge Disparaged in Peacebuilding

Local Knowledge Disparaged in Peacebuilding

Because the United Nations (UN) places higher value in the career advancement process on professional skills like business management than on local knowledge, and the career trajectory of peacebuilders often includes rotations through various UN agencies and non-governmental organizations (NGOs), the broader field of peacebuilding is discouraged from valuing and integrating local knowledge.

The Role of Assumptions in Shaping International Support of Local Peacebuilding

The Role of Assumptions in Shaping International Support of Local Peacebuilding

Many international peacebuilding actors operate according to “unsupported, untested, and potentially flawed assumptions about peace, peacebuilding, and the role of outsiders and insiders” that fundamentally shape their interventions and can lead to less successful and even counterproductive local peacebuilding outcomes.

Recognizing the Hidden Politics of Local Peacebuilding

Recognizing the Hidden Politics of Local Peacebuilding

A Western ideal of “the local” can be a site of exclusion where local actors have different levels of power, enabling some locals to govern the conduct and participation of other, less powerful locals.

Special Issue: Local, National, and International Peacebuilding

Special Issue: Local, National, and International Peacebuilding

We are pleased to present our special issue on the relationship between local, national, and international peacebuilding in partnership with Peace Direct. The recent reorientation towards local peacebuilding represents a radical shift in whose voices are centered in the work of creating a more peaceful and just world. The grievances that lead to war are rarely, if ever, addressed through violence. Instead, after war these grievances persist, joined by the immeasurable loss of human life and the all-encompassing trauma, fear, polarization, and neglect that violence begets. When countries emerge from war, the very act of peacebuilding constitutes a rethinking of the social and political problems that gave rise to these grievances. It matters, therefore, that decision-making power in peacebuilding rest with those directly affected by these problems and their potential solutions.