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Analyses

Militarism Is a Threat to Democracy

Militarism Is a Threat to Democracy

In the context of OECD countries over the time period of 2010-2016, militarism has an adverse impact on democracy over time.

Militarizing Women’s Rights in Jordan

Militarizing Women’s Rights in Jordan

Women’s rights activists in Jordan understood that making progress on women’s rights legislation was contingent on navigating a militarized political landscape where a protectionist narrative of women’s rights would make legislation more likely to pass.

From Dialogue to Broader Societal Change in Bosnia-Herzegovina

From Dialogue to Broader Societal Change in Bosnia-Herzegovina

Dialogue projects have also been able to positively affect the broader sociopolitical context in BiH, largely through the work of affiliated alumni action groups who have engaged in joint action and activism to address societal problems, thereby demonstrating “that it is possible to bridge ethnic divides.”

Uncovering the Extent and Nature of Sexual Violence in Wartime Sri Lanka

Uncovering the Extent and Nature of Sexual Violence in Wartime Sri Lanka

A list experiment is an effective research method for uncovering sensitive information, as its use suggests that sexual violence was much more prevalent during the Sri Lankan civil war (affecting about 13.4% of the population) than direct questioning would indicate (at 1.4% of the population).

Threats, Public Support, and Military Intervention

Threats, Public Support, and Military Intervention

“[W]hether public opinion is a constraint on military action or an effect of threats strongly depends on the primary objective of the military operation and whether or not the threats to a state’s national interests are clear and tangible.”

Beyond Armed Conflict: Exploring Broader Understandings of Reconciliation in Colombia

Beyond Armed Conflict: Exploring Broader Understandings of Reconciliation in Colombia

There are fairly evenly split views on the possibility of reconciliation with former combatants, as well as varied opinions (sometimes along gender, income, education level, and/or regional lines) on which activities would foster reconciliation and how willing respondents would be to come into close contact with former combatants.